2014 Humanitarian Hero Mohiuddin Khan

DUTY STATION:  Bangladesh
POSITION:  Project Coordinator

“There is always a need of innovation since every single incident is new and has its own demand.”

WHY DID YOU BECOME A HUMANITARIAN WORKER OR VOLUNTEER? 

In the beginning of my medical career, I worked in a very rural community of my country, where a major portion of the population were living in poverty. Most of the patients in the communities were suffering from some avoidable communicable disease. I started dreaming myself to be a public health humanitarian volunteer and not merely a clinician. So that I will be able to serve a greater population and the people who are in dire needs of the services. 

WHAT'S THE MOST REWARDING PART OF YOUR WORK? 

The most rewarding part of my work is to see someone’s life is restored and s/he gets back to normal productive life because of the programme intervention or support. It is most satisfying to me when I see programme supports bring up new hope in individuals and in the communities. 

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MORE CHALLENGING ASPECTS OF YOUR WORK? 

Crisis and conflict affected work environment is always challenging. We need to take most appropriate decision in a meaningful ways in humanitarian grounds and in crisis situation. There is always a need of innovation since every single incident is new and has its own demand. That is why humanitarian workers always need to be vigilant, hardworking and passionate in their responsibilities to encompass more lives to be saved. 

TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE WORK YOU DO? 

I coordinate a comprehensive emergency health and WATSAN project for refugees and internally displaced vulnerable population in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Among other things, we deploy mobile medical teams for underserved hard-to-reach population, train and supervise volunteer outreach teams. 

WHAT IS THE MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT YOU’VE EXPERIENCED DURING YOUR WORK?

One of my most memorable moments is when I saw a boy of 22 years resumed his small business, when he returned back to his village after having a major surgery in his stomach. He was rapidly moving to a state of shock at that night. It was impossible to arrange his operation in that remote location, due to lack of facilities. The medical team managed to transfer him at a district level clinic and arranged all the necessities for an emergency OT. A week later, he was discharged and went back to his village. He visited our team later as a sign of gratitude.