Eunjin Jeong

Hit film stirs up empathy for foreign workers in Korea

Republic of Korea - It took only four weeks for the film “Ode to My Father” to attract one in every five Koreans to the nearest movie theater

 

Assisting Patients to Return Home

“I don’t know how I would have managed to return home without IOM since there is no public transportation stopping near my village and I cannot walk,” said Mani Rai.

 

Assisting Patients to Return Home

By Eunjin Jeong

“I don’t know how I would have managed to return home without IOM since there is no public transportation stopping near my village and I cannot walk,” said Mani Rai, a 65-year-old Nepalese man who just came back to his home in Melamchi Village Development Committee (VDC) in Sindhupalchowk district through IOM’s Assisted Discharge and Referral Service.

“The only option would have been my family carrying me all the way from downtown to home with a stretcher, which would have taken hours,” he continued.

Namaste, Equality, and Superman

By Eunjin Jeong

My first instinct when I spotted the two women from a small community in Sindhupalchok marching towards me was that I should maybe stop taking photos of their shattered community; perhaps I was rubbing salt in their wounds.

Over the past three weeks they’d seen their lives change forever, their homes destroyed, family, friends and neighbours killed, livelihoods wiped out.

When our eyes met, however, my doubts melted away. One of the women raised her hands, palms touching and fingers pointing upwards: “Namaste”, she said, the customary form of Hindu greeting meaning ‘I bow to the divine in you’. Her pressed hands could not hide a shy smile, her eyes hinting that she was genuinely happy to see a foreign face like mine interested in telling their stories when help is most needed. 

Hit film stirs up empathy for foreign workers in Korea

By Eunjin Jeong, Communications Officer at IOM Seoul