Joe Lowry

The Trouble with Trafficking


By Joe Lowry

The trouble with human trafficking is that with all the resources and thought that has been poured into the phenomenon over the years, no one really understands what’s going on. Not governments, not NGOS, not the police, not think tanks… no one apart from the people traffickers, who change their modus operandi  like the wind, in order to stay one step ahead.

On the razor’s edge – recovery in Northern Sri Lanka


By Joe Lowry

A haircut and a shave in Edward Roshan’s barber shop outside Killinochchi, northern Sri Lanka costs just under two dollars. He and his family have become specialists in close shaves – their life over the past seven years is a blur of conflict, escape, hunger, hardship, loss of identity and fear.

Under the bridge


(Photo by Mikel Flamm)

By Joe Lowry

Doy Sen is 24 and has a permanent look of confusion etched upon his face. He left his native town of Tuanggoo, Myanmar ten years ago because of the conflict there. “I am not from a poor family”, he says, but now he is, indisputably, badly off. Three years ago he “settled” under his bridge on highway 1095, where he lives in a mosquito net, his clothes hanging on a line, his pots and plates his only real possessions. His nearest neighbours are two oxen.

Friends with Benefits? Migrants on the Move


By Joe Lowry

Most people understand the need to screen for TB when people are on the move: it ensures they are healthy to travel, that they will not carry disease with them and that they will be able to work when they get to their destination countries. But here's the thing: IOM also sets out to ensure the health rights of migrants, which means providing health services for people at all stages of the migration cycles.

Building a base for sustainable healthcare in rural Thailand


By Joe Lowry

A remarkable health intervention in Northern Thailand is coming to an end – and to a new beginning. In early 2010 a joint IOM/UN/Government of Thailand programme set out to bring primary health care to some of the remotest villages on the border with Myanmar with the modest outlay of USD100,000 a year.

“He just smiled and gave me a Vegemite sandwich”

Best TV show or Documentary Showing Migrants in a Positive Light
Australia’s film-makers embrace the migration narrative