Communications Toolkit

All about Communications Toolkit

A crash course in humanitarian radio

By Naomi Mihara

‘You have 30 minutes to set up the station and start broadcasting.  Now GO, GO, GO!’. After a mass scramble as we tried to remember what we’d practiced in the classroom the week before, like magic, we were live on air.

Better a captive audience than an audience of captives


By Douglas Foskett

Landlocked, with six and a half million people living in 17 provinces surrounded by five countries (Vietnam, China, Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand), Laos is not exactly an isolated country. All of its 17 provinces have at least one international border, nine of them have two.  So while plenty of legal transit points are accessible, crossing illegally is not exactly difficult either. To cross legally people need a passport, and these are only available at one location in the capital Vientiane. That’s where the IOM TV and DVD player are installed. 

Is Migration the New Facebook?


Photo by: Albert González Farran / UNAMID / CC BY-NC-ND

By Charmaine Caparas

One out of seven people in the world uses Facebook and one out of seven people alive today is a migrant. So what, if any, is the connection? Plenty if we are to believe Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who declared this week that he wants to achieve humanitarian goals with his (vast) private sector profits.

Twitter Speeds Up Real-Time Disaster Response


By Charmaine Caparas

If you still don't believe in Twitter, then this new finding could change your mind: Twitter can save lives! According to a recent report conducted by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, social network Twitter has played a key role in some of the most destructive natural disasters in the world including the Japan earthquake in 2011 and the monsoon rains in the Philippines in 2012.

Taking Photos in the Field


By Ray Leyesa

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.”

These words from Robert Capa, a Hungarian war photographer, photojournalist and co-founder of Magnum Photos, have been taught to photojournalism students for decades. But getting a closer shot does not mean using a long lens or the zoom functions of your camera. What Capa was saying was to physically get closer, be more involved and to some extent be intimate with your subjects.

It's Not (only) About Money


By Charmaine Caparas

More than 215 million people across the globe live outside of the countries they call home, most of them originating in the developing world. This is what the diaspora looks like. It explains, in part, why IOM was able to galvanize so much international attention for its ministerial-level Diaspora Conference.  

Tell Me What You Really Think


By Charmaine Caparas

Social media now has tremendous influence over the way people around the world — of all ages — get and share information. In today’s interconnected world, everyone is looking for accountability and value for their money. With more than 1.11 billion Facebook users, 500 million Twitter users and 3 million bloggers, social media is not just as a means to broadcast institutional messages but a way to engage in a two-way conversation with stakeholders. It's the key to finding what people are really talking about and what their needs are.

What Would Lady Gaga Do?


By Ken Matsueda

Facebook is really difficult. To be more exact, I didn’t realise that managing Facebook page is that difficult and energy-consuming until the moment I launched and started to update IOM Nepal’s new Facebook page.

Terror on the High Seas


By Ray Leyesa

ICONIC Photos, a photo blog, recently featured photographer Chris Anderson’s past work on Haitian migrants who attempted to enter the United States way back in 2000. Together with journalist Mike Finkel, the two documented the journey of 44 Haitians over treacherous waters in their 23-foot boat. Their journey ended disastrously with the boat sinking in the Caribbean.

A Mapping Revolution...


By Leonard Doyle

WOULD you like to know about an innovative high-tech initiative to help vulnerable communities build resilience, ahead of the coming hurricane/typhoon season, by using low-tech solutions? If so, read on.

Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?


By Leonard Doyle

WHEN migration hits the news, the outcome is often unnerving. The way the subject is handled by journalists can be either inflammatory or reassuring and is all too often the former.

The Scoop! (on gender) in Emergencies

By Ray Leyesa

NATURAL disasters are often big news that create international headlines and bring in their wake the traveling media in all its crazy-quilt diversity. The limelight goes of course to the blow-dried anchormen and women of the networks with their retinues of fixers, producers, drivers and of course security folks.