Diaspora

One Small Thing Can Make a Big Difference


By Leonard Doyle

Brilliantly encapsulating what it is to be a humanitarian aid worker, Matt Bowlby of IOM Haiti describes his daily rounds of a displacement camp thus: "You’re here to do one small thing that’s going to make a big difference."

In that short and pithy phrase, delivered as he bantered in creole with residents still displaced by the earthquake of three years ago, he summed up what keeps so many humanitarian aid workers returning to work in the often dangerous conditions of emergencies. In the film Matt and Magdala Michelle Jean-Pierre talk about the rewards and challenges of humanitarian work in Haiti.

19 August was World Humanitarian Day a month long initiative that invites you to sponsor a word and turn your voice to help millions of people worldwide affected by disasters. IOM and United Nations ask supporters to complete the sentence: The world needs more…

Beauty or the Beast


By Kensuke Matsueda

7.00 am. It was a lovely sunny day in the monsoon season. The sun was slowly rising in the blue sky above the old city of Kathmandu in Nepal. The orangish old Newari temples were modestly glittering. Some people were quickly commuting to school and work in town, while others were busily buying vegetables and fruits for breakfast in the local market. In such a perfectly usual morning scene, a woman standing next to me whispered one word, “Scary...”

Migration and Development Move Centre Stage

By Jill Helke

It is sometimes startling to think that almost a billion of the World’s 7 billion people are either internal or international migrants. In other words, one out of every seven people alive today is a migrant. But migration affects not only those who move but also those who do not, above all communities of origin and destination.     

Migrant remittances – more than $400 billion dollars a year – are four times greater than all the money transferred via global aid every year. Labour markets and social systems have come to depend on the mobility of workers, entrepreneurs, health professionals and researchers.  In short, the movement of people across borders into jobs with higher productivity has been the back story of so much recent economic growth and development. But remittances and economic assets are not the only arguments in favour of migration. 

It's Not (only) About Money


By Charmaine Caparas

More than 215 million people across the globe live outside of the countries they call home, most of them originating in the developing world. This is what the diaspora looks like. It explains, in part, why IOM was able to galvanize so much international attention for its ministerial-level Diaspora Conference.  

When the Diaspora Drives Development

The World Bank's OKSANA PIDUFALA tells us in her blog that  IOM's recent Diaspora Ministerial Conference on the theme “Diasporas and Development: Bridging between Societies and States” was the first of its kind to serve as an international platform for diaspora ministries and representatives to discuss the role and contribution of diaspora in development policy. The event brought together some 55 high level government officials from 115 countries with about 500 participants in total. 

The Takeaway: The event has sent a clear signal of governments’ interest in increasing collaboration with diaspora communities to capitalize on their potential for development.