Labour Migration

Equipping Somalia’s Youth for the Labour Market

Over the last two decades, Somalia has constantly been on the news, all for the wrong reasons. We often hear of Al Shabaab attacks and the term ‘failed state’ is invoked so often as if it’s Somalia’s second name.

World Bank proposes some Pacific solutions


By Joe Lowry

I am no Pacific expert, but my trips to rural Papua New Guinea, and my marathon flight from Bangkok to Majuro (via Manila, Guam, Palau, Chuuk, Kwajalein, Pohnpei – and then from Majuro to a teeny tiny atoll in the midst of a turquoise ocean) got me thinking.

Migration in a Globalized World

By Joost van der Aalst, Chief of Mission, IOM Norway

In April, I spoke at Amnesty Norway’s Euronation festival in Tromsø. It was a great event that spoke volumes about northern Norway’s commitment to international development. As organisations, IOM and Amnesty have much in common: we work in hundreds of countries across the world, we have been operating for over half a century, we are independent and, perhaps most importantly, we exist to promote human rights and international law.

32 thousand migrants have left Italy in 2011

32 thousand migrants have left Italy in 2011: 87 million Euros less in tax revenues

Presented in Milan, the data of the "Report on the Economy of Immigration in Italy 2013," published by the Moressa Foundation and sponsored by IOM Rome.

In Italy, there are 2.3 million migrant workers which represent 10.1 % of the workforce, contribute for over 12% of Italian GDP, and count up to the 8.3 % of total taxpayers. Their income declaration notify 43.6 billion euros to the National Revenue and they pay 6.5 billion Euros in income taxes. Their unemployment rate (14.1%) had an increase of about 5.6 percentage points from 2008 to 2011.

A Very Tall Order for Action

By Leonard Doyle

“Nearly a billion people rely on migration as the best way to increase their personal liberty and to improve health, education, and economic outcomes for their families. If the right policies are put in place, there is clear evidence that states can magnify these positive outcomes, while also generating significant financial and social gains for countries of origin and destination.”

That, in a nutshell, is what Peter Sutherland, the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Migration says is at stake in October of this year, when for only the second time in its history, the UN General Assembly will focus on international migration. If it is to succeed, Sutherland says, the summit must generate action on how to reduce the economic and human costs of migration. It also must determine how states and other stakeholders can deepen their cooperation in solving migration-related problems—“all while avoiding the political axe-grinding typical of most migration debates.”

These are nuanced words from a seasoned public figure and they reward careful reading. As Sutherland points out in his article in the just published Migration Policy and Practice for June 2013, migration is one of the hot button issue of international diplomacy.

now read on here

Migration Takes a Bow at Cannes Film Festival


by Kaye Viray (and Agence France Presse)

LAST week’s Cannes Film Festival was an eye-opener for the way migration is now a major theme of our times. 

Films now regularly depict people setting off for a new country, bearing little more than dreams of a better life. But behind the romance of every film touching on migration comes the reality that so many of those moving from their homelands soon discover that reality is not as rose-tinted as they imagined it might be. Many face the perils of trafficking, exploitation, aching loneliness and rootlessness. All of this is grist to the film industry's mill.

When Migrants are Seen as a Blessing not a Scourge

By Leonard Doyle

Lets face it, "migration is the original strategy for people seeking to escape poverty, mitigate risk, and build a better life. It has been with us since the dawn of mankind, and its economic impact today is massive."

That these words were published on the eve of St Patrick's Day, by an Irishman - a country with a long track record in migration - is not a surprise. Sutherland's words resonate in today's globalised world because migrants’ remittances are literally pulling the economies of countries of origin up by their bootstraps.