Missing Migrants

Missing Migrants Update | 23 July 2015

The Missing Migrants Project is the only global database sharing key data on deceased and missing migrants arund the world. 

“You have Landed in Sicily”

By Flavio Di Giacomo

"You have landed in Sicily. Do you know where that is?" Abduraman is staring into space, listening to the voice of the cultural mediator. She's showing a map of Europe to a group of unaccompanied children – gathered in a tent shelter protecting them from Palermo’s blistering summer sun.

For Abduraman, a 15-year-old Somali, the journey was too hard for him to now rejoice. He left Somalia with a group of friends several months ago. He has survived the hazards of passing through Libya, where, like many transiting migrants, he was beaten and abused. His back still bears the bruises.

Missing Migrants Update | 14 July 2015

The Missing Migrants Project is the only global database sharing key data on deceased and missing migrants arund the world. 

 

Migration Comes of Age

By William Lacy Swing
First published in Strategic Review

This is the age of migration. There have, of course, been times of great population flow: the mass movements at the end of World War II, or the early years of the 20th century, when the populations of US cities began to surge. Others would point to the move across the Western United States, or further back to the age of colonialism and exploration by Europe.

But I firmly contend that migration, as it exists right now, is the mega-trend of our times, and is ineffably changing the world as we know and experience it.

Media update

BBC published a report based on IOM’s press release about the bodies of migrants found in the Sahara desert in Niger. IOM’s Giuseppe Loprete was quoted in RTL in an article on how Niger found itself in the middle of a migrant crisis. Loprete said that what we see happening in the Mediterranean can be a small part “of the iceberg.” 

Eastern Mediterranean: dramatic increase in migrant flows

By Tara Brian

While media coverage has tended to focus on the Central Mediterranean – routes from Northern Africa to Italy and Malta – in fact, it is the Eastern Mediterranean that has seen a dramatic increase in migrant flows this year. Maritime arrivals to Greece in just the first five months of 2015 have already eclipsed the total number for 2014 (roughly 48,000 in 2015 compared with 34,400 in 2014). In 2014, maritime arrivals to Greece were just about 20% the size of arrivals to Italy (170,100). This year, however, arrivals to Greece are only about 10,000 shy of the numbers being received in Italy. While flows to Greece have expanded significantly in the past year, Italy has seen only a 15% increase in arrivals compared to this time last year.