Twitter Speeds Up Real-Time Disaster Response


By Charmaine Caparas

If you still don't believe in Twitter, then this new finding could change your mind: Twitter can save lives! According to a recent report conducted by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, social network Twitter has played a key role in some of the most destructive natural disasters in the world including the Japan earthquake in 2011 and the monsoon rains in the Philippines in 2012.

Beauty or the Beast


By Kensuke Matsueda

7.00 am. It was a lovely sunny day in the monsoon season. The sun was slowly rising in the blue sky above the old city of Kathmandu in Nepal. The orangish old Newari temples were modestly glittering. Some people were quickly commuting to school and work in town, while others were busily buying vegetables and fruits for breakfast in the local market. In such a perfectly usual morning scene, a woman standing next to me whispered one word, “Scary...”

Taking Photos in the Field


By Ray Leyesa

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.”

These words from Robert Capa, a Hungarian war photographer, photojournalist and co-founder of Magnum Photos, have been taught to photojournalism students for decades. But getting a closer shot does not mean using a long lens or the zoom functions of your camera. What Capa was saying was to physically get closer, be more involved and to some extent be intimate with your subjects.

Eyewitness to Unspeakable Abuse


By Leonard Doyle

The fate of eighty thousand Ethiopians who risk their lives every year trying to get to Saudi Arabia and the promise of a better life has been put in vivid focus by a report on Newsnight, BBC television’s flagship news programme. The disturbing report highlights the remarkable humanitarian work of IOM staff caring for the traumatised migrants.   

After the rain


By Joe Lowry in the northern Marshall Islands

It’s raining in Taroa Island; a warm, lush, tropical rain which feels more like a benediction than a penance. Washing away inequity. The sandy soil gurgles with pleasure, the roofs and water storage tanks thrum their applause.

I am 120 miles, a 16-hour sea journey from the capital of the Marshall Islands, halfway between the end of the Asian landmass and the beginning of America. As far east as the furthest tip of Russia. On a tiny, palm-fringed dot of coral, poking out of a million square kilometers of the vast and mighty Pacific.