Unique Music Event in Japan Turns Tears into Safe Water in Somalia


Mr. Terai (right), “tp bank”, the organizer of “Ruikatsu” event donated part of ticket sales to IOM Somalia. Mr. Barriga, Chief of Mission IOM Japan received it on behalf of IOM Somalia. © IOM/Yuko Goto 2015

By Dr. Chiaki Ito

“tp bank”, the organizer of “Ruikatsu”, an event which consists of pop music, moving short films and storytelling, and meant to make audience shed tears to unload stress, donated part of its ticket sales, to the International Organization for Migration (IOM) to provide safe water in Somalia.  The event was held in Tokyo, Japan on 22 July 2015.

The donation will help to provide safe water to vulnerable internally displaced families who live in makeshift shelters across Somalia, and their host communities.

Dr Chiaki Ito, Health Programme Coordinator at IOM Somalia, said, “the money will go a long way in servicing IOM’s already stretched health programme, because the need on the ground far outstrips available resources.”

Speaking at the concert, IOM Tokyo’s Chief of Mission, Mr. William Barriga, said, “We are grateful to the organizer and to the audience tonight for the donations in support of IOM Somalia safer water project. The work IOM and partners do is vital to the survival and development of hundreds of vulnerable Somalis.”

IOM is an organization specialized in the field of global migration and human mobility, having offices in over 100 countries. In the region called Horn of Africa, and located at the tip of Eastern Africa, Somalia has been suffering from the prolonged conflict and recurring natural disasters such as drought.

Many people had to flee from their hometown to neighbouring countries or living in dire situations in camps for internally displaced persons. As many of the public service facilities were destroyed during the prolonged conflict, only 30 per cent of the Somali population have access to safe water.

Due to the lack of access to safe water, many displaced communities in Somalia are suffering from diseases, such as diarrhea and cholera, and it is not uncommon to die as a result of such diseases.

IOM has been providing safe water for internally displaced communities and returnees, who have fled the country once as refugees, and their host community in 15 project locations throughout Somalia.

To date IOM distributes clean and safe water in fifteen project locations across Somalia, benefitting some 170,000 people every month, mostly in internally displaced person (IDP) settlements throughout Somalia, with financial support from various donors such as the Government of Japan.

For more information please contact:

“tp bank”, the organizer of “Ruikatsu”, an event which consists of pop music, moving short films and storytelling, and meant to make audience shed tears to unload stress, donated part of its ticket sales, to the International Organization for Migration (IOM) to provide safe water in Somalia.  The event was held in Tokyo, Japan on 22 July 2015.

The donation will help to provide safe water to vulnerable internally displaced families who live in makeshift shelters across Somalia, and their host communities.

Dr Chiaki Ito, Health Programme Coordinator at IOM Somalia, said, “the money will go a long way in servicing IOM’s already stretched health programme, because the need on the ground far outstrips available resources.”

Speaking at the concert, IOM Tokyo’s Chief of Mission, Mr. William Barriga, said, “We are grateful to the organizer and to the audience tonight for the donations in support of IOM Somalia safer water project. The work IOM and partners do is vital to the survival and development of hundreds of vulnerable Somalis.”

IOM is an organization specialized in the field of global migration and human mobility, having offices in over 100 countries. In the region called Horn of Africa, and located at the tip of Eastern Africa, Somalia has been suffering from the prolonged conflict and recurring natural disasters such as drought.

Many people had to flee from their hometown to neighbouring countries or living in dire situations in camps for internally displaced persons. As many of the public service facilities were destroyed during the prolonged conflict, only 30 per cent of the Somali population have access to safe water.

Due to the lack of access to safe water, many displaced communities in Somalia are suffering from diseases, such as diarrhea and cholera, and it is not uncommon to die as a result of such diseases.

IOM has been providing safe water for internally displaced communities and returnees, who have fled the country once as refugees, and their host community in 15 project locations throughout Somalia.

To date IOM distributes clean and safe water in fifteen project locations across Somalia, benefitting some 170,000 people every month, mostly in internally displaced person (IDP) settlements throughout Somalia, with financial support from various donors such as the Government of Japan.

For more information please contact:

Dr. Chiaki Ito
IOM Somalia
Email: cito@iom.int